underground music

Underground Music Report Nu Disco

underground music

The way we get music recommendations has changed dramatically over the years. A lot of it used to simply be done by word of mouth. Radio, and music charts based on record sales, came next. Then came social media, and ingenious software applications like Spotify and Pandora, which allowed us to share playlists and find music that correlated more closely with our tastes (e.g., “if you liked Song A, you will probably like Song B, because 121,374 other people did…”). But this has only really succeeded with more traditional or mainstream music genres that have benefited from more generous financial backing, such as pop, indie rock, hip hop, and so forth. What about the tech-nerds and club-heads who are looking for the bleepy and obscure underground house and techno tracks that they hear from their favorite DJs and clubs? Ask any true-blue house music junkie what they think about what Pandora is serving up in the genre: it’s not cutting-edge or underground… and rarely current.
Coupled with that, the sheer volume of music out there has grown to a nearly unmanageable volume, especially in the world of electronic dance music (EDM). Why? Production means have become dirt cheap and readily available. Fifteen years ago, in order to make a dance music track, you needed lots of cash to buy tons of expensive and complicated hardware to fill a studio space, and then needed to devote yourself to it full-time in order to learn the gear and crank out anything release-worthy. Also, pre-mp3, the music was being released on vinyl records – an expensive and cumbersome (yet tasty…) medium. This made it so only a relative handful of dedicated artists and labels were making and releasing all the tracks, so there was only a limited amount of new vinyl releases every week at the shop.

Today, in the age of inexpensive and accessible computer-based music production, and easy web-based distribution and retail, any kid with a laptop and an Internet connection can install hacked production software and churn out a techno track. This is good and bad. Good because it has leveled the playing field and democratized the field of electronic music production for anyone and everyone. Bad because the sheer volume of house music tracks being released each week is insane, and the quality can be wildly inconsistent. On Beatport, the iTunes of the EDM world, you can find literally thousands of brand new releases hitting the “shelves” each and every week.
So as an electronic dance music fan or casual listener, how do you get your deep, dark, and dirty underground trance fix? The answer still is: the DJs. They are still the filter of thousands of new tracks every week, bringing you a customized and “curated” listening experience to shake your ass to in the club, or via a free one-hour online “mixtape” (if you’re not on soundcloud.com and mixcloud.com yet, get on it…). But even then, the tracks you’re hearing are fairly anonymous: you are on a dark after hours dance floor, working it out to a sick disco-house track, but you have no idea who made it and what it’s called. It becomes a temporary and transient…Click To See Full Article